Return of the Iceland ash cloud? Fears grow of Katla volcanic eruption

Psalm 68:33 “to Him who rides in the ancient, highest heavens. Look, He thunders with His powerful voice!”

The thunder you hear in thunder storms, that is Mother’s voice. Since She is nature in the raw, you know when She is angry.

Psalm 68:2 2 As smoke is blown away, so You blow [them] away. As wax melts before the fire, so the wicked are destroyed before God.

Like WAX that melts – Yahweh’s SCORCH PROPHECY remains in effect through the end time. ” but the rebellious live in a scorched land.”

Look around you. What is progressively happening to this planet?

Earthquake activity registered near the volcano meaning an eruption could be imminent, experts say.

An Icelandic volcano that could have a more devastating impact than the one that paralysed air traffic last year may erupt at any moment, experts have warned.

Seismologists are nervously watching rumblings beneath Katla, a volcano on the southern edge of the north Atlantic island nation, which could mean an eruption is imminent.

Katla is a much bigger volcano than nearby Eyjafjallajokul, the 2010 eruption of which cost airlines £1.27billion after ash grounded flights across Europe.

Named after an evil troll, Katla has a larger magma chamber than Eyjafjallajokul’s. Its last major eruption in 1918 continued more than a month, turning day into night, starving crops of sunlight and killing off some livestock.

The eruption melted some of the ice-sheet covering Katla, flooding surrounding farmlands with a torrent of water that some accounts have said measured as wide as the Amazon.

Now, clusters of small earthquakes are being detected around Katla, which means an eruption could be imminent, seismologists say.

Worryingly, earthquakes have been growing in strength: after a long period of magnitude three tremors, a magnitude four quake was detected last week.

‘It is definitely showing signs of restlessness,’ said Piall Einarsson, a professor of geophysics at the University of Iceland, who added that the Eyjafjallajokul was ‘small’, despite its impact.

Teams of seismologists and geologists at the university are now working with disaster officials to prepare nearby communities like Vik, a small town of some 300 people that is flanked by black sand beaches.

Disaster officials have drafted an evacuation plan and set aside temporary housing, but many fear they may have less than an hour to evacuate once the volcano erupts. – Mail Online

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