ANOTHER satellite to crash land soon, and the odds of it hitting someone are even higher

The beginning of August, 2011 we reported to you that satellite failures would be ahead. We will continue to update you.

The LOZ is in preparation to knock out earth communication satellites. This latest chess move will also affect the weapon satellites that are not shielded in class 2 category. Those will remain in working order until the LOZ individually targets each one of them.

Non communication will throw the entire world of people into a panic mode.

Revelation 16:8, 9 “The Fourth Bowl
The fourth poured out his bowl on the sun. He was given the power to burn people with fire, and people were burned by the intense heat. So they blasphemed the name of God who had the power over these plagues, and they did not repent and give Him glory.”

The world was gripped by the Nasa UARS satellite that fell back to Earth last Saturday – and now there’s another that’s plummeting back from orbit.

In late October or early November a Germany astronomy satellite – called ROSAT- will plunge uncontrolled back to Earth.

While slightly smaller than UARS, the German satellite is expected to have more pieces survive re-entry. The German space agency estimated that it has a 1-in-2000 chance of hitting someone – higher than the 1-in-3,200 odds NASA gave for UARS.

The German ROSAT satellite was launched in 1990, ‘died’ in 1998 and weighs two and a half tonnes.

The German space agency estimates that 30 pieces weighing less than two tons will survive re-entry. Debris may include sharp mirror shards.

The German space agency puts the odds of somebody somewhere on Earth being hurt by its satellite at 1-in-2,000 — a slightly higher level of risk than was calculated for the Nasa satellite.

Again, it seems certain that information on when – or where – the satellite might land will be scant.

But any one individual’s odds of being struck are 1-in-14trillion.

Heiner Klinkrad, head of the Space Debris Office at the European Space Agency, said in a webcast posted on the German Aerospace Center’s website: ‘It is not possible to accurately predict ROSAT’s re-entry.

‘The uncertainty will decrease as the moment of re-entry approaches. It will not be possible to make any kind of reliable forecast about where the satellite will actually come down until about one or two hours before the fact.’

Experts believe that two dozen metal pieces from the bus-sized Nasa satellite fell over a 500-mile span in the Pacific Ocean.

It began hitting the water southwest of Christmas Island. – Daily Mail

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