Arctic Ice Shrinks and Land Crumbles Under Storms

Storm surges have hit the Arctic coastline throughout recorded history. Scientists at the University of Alaska Fairbanks reported evidence of 90 storm surges, some as high as 13 feet, on the west coast of Alaska from 1898 to 1980. The big difference now, however, is that the surges are becoming more frequent and intense as the rapid loss of sea ice alters the physics of storms and wave action in the Arctic Ocean.

The farther away the pack ice is from shore, the greater the distance of open water over which the wind can blow, which is known as fetch. That means that more energy is transferred to the water, creating larger waves.

“The greater the fetch,” says storm surge modeler David Atkinson of the University of Victoria in Canada, “the greater potential for a surge.”

In addition, notes Atkinson, land-fast sea ice protects the coastline from surges. And the less ice floating on the ocean, the more opportunity for the wind to transfer its energy to the water, since floating ice tends to absorb wave energy. “No floating ice equals no wasted energy,” says Atkinson.

The situation is expected to worsen considerably if, as many experts project, sea levels rise this century by as much as three to six feet as ice sheets and glaciers melt.

The impact of storm surges and wave action on coastlines in the western Arctic is now being well documented. Anderson, for example, has seen signs of surges sweeping onto the tundra and killing the vegetation. What concerns him even more is the coastal erosion threatening thousands of freshwater lakes and river deltas lining the western Arctic shoreline. As the thin strips of land that separate the coast’s freshwater lakes from the Arctic Ocean disappear, many of these lakes are draining into the sea.

“I am not a biologist, but it doesn’t require a lot imagination to see how all those geese and ducks that we see flying to the Arctic each year to nest on these tundra lakes will be affected,” says Anderson.

It’s not just geese and ducks or muskoxen and caribou that are vulnerable. Eskimo communities such as Shismareef in Alaska will likely have to be relocated for similar reasons, as little can be done to stop those coastal communities from sliding into the sea.

Source

Genesis 1:2 “Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness covered the surface of the watery depths, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the surface of the waters.”

That “Spirit” of Father’s was Michael that was hovering over the surface of the waters. Once again he was repeating his earlier achievement, except that this time there would be a change in atmospheric layout.

Genesis 1:6 “Then God said, “Let there be an expanse between the waters, separating water from water.”

Instead of the nourishing canopy that kept this planet at a constant comfortable temperature, Michael brought about a climatic change. He separated the waters by freezing the excess waters at the poles. Then, by natural order the skies or lower heavens were free of the canopy so this brought forth seasons and created the weather that brings rain, sleet, hail, snow and unbearable heat to different parts of the world.

Depending on where you live, you are affected by the various changes in the weather. However, at one time that was not the case. But the lifting of the canopy which had been a gift from Father originally, was because mankind was still not in full harmony with Father. To be in harmony brings forth the rebirth of that canopy. The melting of the glaciers resulting in the freeing of the division Michael created in the waters by having previously stored the excess water in the form of ice will lay the ground work for the next canopy to be put back into place.

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